Living Lab Water Indonesia

Some of Indonesia’s delta and coastal areas face challenges that can teach us a lot. The Living Lab Water Indonesia is a quadruple helix collaboration: local companies, citizens, governmental bodies ánd higher education work together. Students, teacher-researchers and associate professors carry out research and apply their expertise on real-life challenges in the water sector of Indonesia. This way students acquire knowledge but the research results also contribute to innovations in the region, as a result of which the region will become more future-proof.

A sustainable port

Indonesia consists of 17,508 islands. For the logistic processes among these islands ports play an important part. To be able to handle the amount of freight, the Indonesian government has decided to build the first ‘green port’ of Indonesia in Surabaya: Terminal Teluk Lamong. This is an extension of the existing port. But what actually is a sustainable port and what is possible?

Mangrove recovery in combination with sustainable fish farming and tourism

Another challenge in Surabaya is the mangrove area between the city and the sea. This area is becoming increasingly smaller because of sea-level rise, the expansion of the urban area through population growth and the need for fish farming space. The mangroves offer many ecosystem services, among which the natural protection against storm surges, erosion, clean water, timber, food, recreation, etc. Aquaculture is often the only way for the local population to meet their daily needs. In the future both the mangroves and the aqua culture are needed. How can mangroves and aquaculture develop jointly and in a sustainable way in combination with opportunities for tourism?

Mud volcano

Since May 2006 the mud volcano Lampur Lapindo in the Sidoarjo region south of Surabaya has been active. Hot mud and gases have meanwhile covered an area of some 1480 acres with a layer of approximately 14 meters of mud, 39,700 people lost their homes, 12 villages have disappeared under the mud, 11,241 buildings and 894 acres of rice fields. The gases influence the air quality and the heavy metals in the mud contaminate the groundwater and consequently agriculture and aquaculture. Which solutions are there for the area to survive with the mud?

The Living Lab Indonesia Indonesia is a collaboration of, among others, HZ and Van Hall Larenstein together with the University Institut Teknologi Sepulu Napember (ITS), the Institute Teknologi Bandung, local companies, non-governmental organisations and bodies in a joint force to tackle these problems. Students of the Delta Academy carry out practice-based research together with Indonesian students in the Living Lab Water. This way students acquire knowledge but the research results also contribute to innovations in this region, as a result of which the region will become more future-proof.

You are using an outdated browser!

Update your browser to display this website correctly. Update my browser now

×